Breakfast/lunch/Dinner, what are you having?

Scepticalscribe

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I didn't feel like cooking today, so...

Chicken sandwich with fries, Cracker Barrel.
Idle but inquiring minds wish to know: What else was in that chicken sandwich? Mayo? Stuffing? Mustard? Cranberry sauce?
 
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Renzatic

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Idle but inquiring minds was to know: What else was in that chicken sandwich? Mayo? Stuffing? Mustard? Cranberry sauce?
Chicken, bacon, lettuce, tomato, drizzled with maple sauce, mayo nixed due to my general dislike of all things mayo.

It was decent enough. A little overcooked, but overall, it ate.
 

Scepticalscribe

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Chicken, bacon, lettuce, tomato, drizzled with maple sauce, mayo nixed due to my general dislike of all things mayo.

It was decent enough. A little overcooked, but overall, it ate.
Maple syrup?

Ever try blending that with mustard?

If you dislike mayo, have you ever attempted to make a classic homemade aioli - i.e. - garlic mayonnaise - as I did this evening? (Garlic (lots; I do not understand the concept of moderation when cooking with garlic), egg yolk (organic, free range, tastes better, and is a lot better for the quality of life for the hens), salt, and olive oil).
 

Renzatic

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Maple syrup?

Ever try blending that with mustard?
No, but that does sound interesting. I might need to give that a go next time I make a homemade chicken sandwich.

If you dislike mayo, have you ever attempted to make a classic homemade aioli - i.e. - garlic mayonnaise - as I did this evening? (Garlic (lots; I do not understand the concept of moderation when cooking with garlic), egg yolk (organic, free range, tastes better, and is a lot better for the quality of life for the hens), salt, and olive oil).
There are only a handful of things containing mayo that I can endure. I did once make a cayenne pepper sauce that used mayo as a base, and the pepper disguised the flavor enough that I was able to eat it.

...gaw, I hate this. I'm fairly unsatisfied with what I ate, but I'm too full to go out and try for anything better.
 

Scepticalscribe

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Maple syrup with a smooth mustard, or even, one of those smooth, sweet, mustards (such as fig mustard), could work very well.

The only reason I mentioned aioli (apart from the fact that I had my French class this evening, thus, matters French were on my mind, and then I discovered a craving for homemade aioli as I had crab claws to hand, ten minutes work, glass of white Burgundy nearby to offer inspiration) is that classic aioli (i.e. the original, homemade garlic mayonnaise) is comprised of totally natural ingredients (the basics are olive oil, egg yolks, garlic, salt) i.e. no additives or preservatives, or weird chemicals, or funny e-numbers, some of which might be found in a jar of shop bought mayonnaise.
 
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lizkat

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Supper tonight is spicy stir fried chopped eggplant. First coat the chopped eggplant (about three or four cups) with a little cornstarch after having sweated it with a bit of vinegar and salt, rinsed and patted dry, then fry until golden brown in some grapeseed oil and set aside. Then put into the fry pan a little more oil, couple tablespoons each of minced garlic and ginger, the chopped white parts and some of the green parts of four or five scallions (reserving a bit of the green parts for garnish) plus five or six little finely chopped green chiles... fry that a little, add dash of red pepper flake, couple tablespoons of soy sauce, a tad of rice vinegar, a little sugar and some water to make the sauce, thicken with a slurry made of a little more cold water and a tablespoon or so of cornstarch. Then add back the fried eggplant pieces and mix well over medium heat to coat with the sauce. Kill the heat, plate up the dish and garnish w/ some of the green parts of scallions and a teaspoon or so of sesame seeds. Yeah no leftovers, so no clue if it's twice as hot the next day behind the pepper flake and chiles.
 

Scepticalscribe

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Supper tonight is spicy stir fried chopped eggplant. First coat the chopped eggplant (about three or four cups) with a little cornstarch after having sweated it with a bit of vinegar and salt, rinsed and patted dry, then fry until golden brown in some grapeseed oil and set aside. Then put into the fry pan a little more oil, couple tablespoons each of minced garlic and ginger, the chopped white parts and some of the green parts of four or five scallions (reserving a bit of the green parts for garnish) plus five or six little finely chopped green chiles... fry that a little, add dash of red pepper flake, couple tablespoons of soy sauce, a tad of rice vinegar, a little sugar and some water to make the sauce, thicken with a slurry made of a little more cold water and a tablespoon or so of cornstarch. Then add back the fried eggplant pieces and mix well over medium heat to coat with the sauce. Kill the heat, plate up the dish and garnish w/ some of the green parts of scallions and a teaspoon or so of sesame seeds. Yeah no leftovers, so no clue if it's twice as hot the next day behind the pepper flake and chiles.
I adore (adore, well, maybe, in this context, "love" will do just fine) aubergine (eggplant to Our Transatlantic Cousins) and always read recipes that feature them with greta interest and greedy enthusiasm.

This sounds delicious.

My recent (as in this year) discovery - with Asian style cooking, or dishes - is to add a dessertspoon or two of classic Asian fish sauce as well as soy sauce.
 
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Scepticalscribe

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Artisan handmade sausages (chilli and fennel, 96% pork), with braised root vegetables.

Three sticks of celery, roughly chopped into large pieces, three medium to small onions, three medium carrots, and two leeks - all chopped roughly and in large pieces - along with a head (bulb) of garlic, the cloves - around nine or ten - individually peeled and halved - sautéed gently in a mix of butter (generous quantity) and some olive oil, until softened.

Then, a jug of stock is added and the vegetables will simmer away happily in that (with the lid on) for around half an hour, to 40-45 minutes; next, with the lid removed, they will cook for a further ten to fifteen minutes.
 
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lizkat

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Some sliced uncured honey-baked ham, heated up and served next to some steamed cauliflower, snap peas and carrot medallions. Everything but the ham gets a drizzle of lemon-butter and shake of red pepper flake at serving time. The ham gets attention from a tad of Dijon mustard along with the knife and fork.
 
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Scepticalscribe

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Broccoli, pasta, garlic & anchovies.

Anchovies (a tin, Ortiz, chopped roughy, and added to the sauté pan with its oil, stirred into the olive oil until dissolved), and garlic (a full head/bulb, nine cloves), chopped very finely, two finely chopped onions, one carrot and one piece (or rib) of celery (very fine diced), all softened in olive oil.

Meanwhile, pasta is cooked in boiling stock; broccoli stems added around five minutes before the pasta is ready, and the florets three minutes later. Then, these are scooped out with a slotted spoon, and added to the sauté pan.

A cup of cooking stock is reserved to be added to the sauté pan before serving.